Last updated: 9/1/2015

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NYS Common Core-ELA & Literacy- Grade 03 - Quarter 2

Why is it important to study story elements?

Why do authors write different types of narratives?

Reading and Writing with Story Elements

(2 weeks)

Resources

Suggested Texts:

  1. Read-Aloud Suggestions for Studying Plot
(2) RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
(3) RL.3.5 Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

Why are character actions important to the sequence of events in a text?

Why is understanding the plot important to understanding the text?

Character Actions

Sequence

Plot

Students will be able to:

  1. Discuss and write about character traits, motivation, and feelings in fiction texts.

  2. Use describing words to describe characters.

  3. Explain in conversations and in writing how character actions contribute to the
    sequence of events in a text.

  4. Describe how sequential events build upon one another to contribute to the plot.

Resources

Students will be reviewing story elements, including character, sequence, and plot.  The following resources will be helfpul. You will want to focus on the elements that have been the most challenging for your class in previous units.

  1. Character Relationships GO.pdf  Graphic Organizer to Study Character More In-Depth

  2. Sequence GO circular.pdf
    Sequence GO timeline.pdf
    Graphic Organizers to Study Sequence

  3. Plot Diagram.pdf Plot Diagram (can be filled out and used for explanation)

  4. Unit Including Four Lessons about Predicting, Character Relations, and Plot

 

Assessments

  1. Passages and Multiple Choice Questions
(2) L.3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
(1) L.3.3.b Recognize and observe differences between the conventions of spoken and written standard English.
(3) L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).
(1) RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
(3) RL.3.5 Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
(1) SL.3.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(1) W.3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
(1) W.3.3.a Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
(1) W.3.3.b Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

How are different types of fiction texts (genres) organized?  How can this help me understand different texts?

How can the writing process help me to create organized and refined writing in a variety of genres?

Reading and Writing Plays

 

Students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish literal from non-literal language, especially as used in dialogue, to determine the meaning of words as they are used in plays.

  2. Describe how sequential events build upon one another to contribute to the plot in a play.

  3. Use genre-specific vocabulary terms (stanza, act, scene) to describe the organization and sequence of a play.

  4. Write a narrative about real or imagined experiences using techniques appropriate for play-writing.

  5. Develop a clear sequence of events in a narrative writing piece.

  6. Introduce characters and establish their situation in a narrative writing piece.

  7. In a narrative writing piece, develop characters and their experiences through dialogue.

  8. In a narrative writing piece, develop characters and their experiences through actions.

  9. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  10. Write for extended time frames to plan, revise, and edit writing to strengthen it for your audience.

  11. Engage in collaborative discussions with a group of peers.

  12. Engage in collaborative discussions, led by the teacher, with the class.

  13. Recognize differences between written and spoken language by speaking and writing with slang when appropriate.

  14. Use spoken language when writing dialogue.

  15. Use new vocabulary, specific to the genre, in speech and writing.

Resources

Student will study story elements specifically as they are presented in plays. Students should discuss the difference between dialogue and written texts. Slang and common phrases should be noted in plays that are read in the reading lessons.  A poster of these could be hung in the room. These graphic organizers can be used as well:

  1. Important Dialogue in Texts GO.pdf

  2. Revealing Dialogue GO.pdf

As a writing project, students will work in groups or as a class to write their own plays. These resources will help:

  1. Students Develop Their Own Readers’ Theatre Scripts (lessons)

  2. Great Website for Reading Other Children's Plays and Studying Elements

  3. Lesson for Writing Dialogue

Assessments

For Assessing Group Work (involves student reflection): 

  1. primaryteamworkrubric.pdf

Rubrics for Writing Plays: 

  1. Play from a Novel Rubric.pdf (for use if your students are drawing from a specific text and turning it into a play)

  2. play rubric.doc
(3) L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).
(3) RL.3.5 Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

How are events in a sequence related?

How do some events “cause” others, in  real life and in texts?

What words give readers signals about sequence and cause and effect in texts?

Cause and Effect in Fiction

(1 week)

Sequence

Cause and Effect

Temporal Words and Phrases

 

Students will be able to:

  1. Describe how sequential events build upon one another to establish cause and effect relationships.

  2. Organize a writing piece into sentences and/or paragraphs based on the task.

  3. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  4. Write for shorter time frames appropriate to the task.

  5. Use new vocabulary relating to temporal relationships in speech and writing.

Resources

Lesson Plans and Resources:

Reading:

  1. Lessons for Teaching Sequence

  2. Sequence GO circular.pdf
    Sequence GO timeline.pdf

    (Sequence Graphic Organizers)

  3. Cause and Effect GO.pdf  (Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer)

  4. Lesson #1 for Teaching Cause and Effect

  5. Lesson #2 for Teaching Cause and Effect

*writing activities are incorporated into reading lessons

Word Work:

Students will study temporal words and phrases and use these in cause and effect sentences as they read and write about sequence and cause and effect.

Suggested Texts:

  1. Suggested Read-Alouds for Sequence

  2. Suggested Read-Alouds for Cause and Effect

Assessments

  1. Reading Passages and Multiple Choice Questions for Cause and Effect

  2. Cause and effect sentences should be assessed for the following: appropriate use of temporal words, realistic sequential and cause and effect relationships, inclusion of signal words.
(3) L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).
(1) RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
(1) RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

How are events in a sequence of historical events or scientific processes related?

How do some events “cause” others, in real life and in texts?

Cause and Effect in Historical Events and Scientific Processes

(1 week)

Students will be able to:

  1. Describe how sequential events build upon one another to establish cause and effect relationships in historical events.

  2. Describe how sequential events build upon one another to establish cause and effect relationships in scientific processes and procedures.

  3. Describe the connection between different parts of a text. relating to cause and effect.

  4. Organize a writing piece into sentences and/or paragraphs based on the task.

  5. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  6. Write for shorter time frames appropriate to the task.

  7. Use new vocabulary relating to temporal relationships in speech and writing.

Resources

Students will focus on correct use of signal words and identifying the "what" and "why" in a story to determine the cause and effect of a given text in oral conversation, in writing, or on graphic organizers.  The resources below will help.

  1. Cause and Effect in a Science Text (lesson)

  2. Cause and Effect GO.pdf Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer

  3. Students should also study temporal words and phrases and use these in cause and effect sentences as they read and write about sequence and cause and effect.

Suggested Texts:

  1. Suggested Read-Alouds for Cause and Effect

Students will also use signal words to write a paragraph about a chosen cause and effect relationship from history or science.  A variety of ideas are found here:

  1. More Cause and Effect Reading and Writing Ideas

Assessments

  1. Multiple Choice Questions about Cause and Effect

  2. Cause and effect paragraph should be assessed for the following:  relationship chosen higlights cause and effect relationship effectively, addresses a naturally-occurring scientific or historical phenomena, and signal words are used appropriately.

How do authors write for different purposes?

How do readers read texts written for different purposes and in different points of view?

Reading and Writing with Point of View and Author's Purpose

(2 weeks)

Resources

Suggested Texts:

  1. The Three Little Pigs (multiple versions)

  2. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka

  3. Read-Aloud Suggestions for Author's Purpose

  4. Read-Aloud Suggestions for Point of View

Extension Activity:

  1. Lesson for Charting the Different Perspectives of Characters for a  Deeper Understanding of the Text
(2) RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
(1) RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

How can a reader tell who is telling the story? 

Why is it important for a reader to know who is telling the story?

What different purposes can authors write for?

Reading for Point of View

Determing Author's Purpose in a Text

Students will be able to:

  1. Discuss and write about character traits, motivation, and feelings in fiction texts.

  2. Distinguish the narrator's oint of view in a fiction text.

  3. Compare characters' points of view in a fiction text.

Resources

Students will read multiple fiction texts to discuss and write about point of view.  These lessons will be helpful:

  1. Lessons for Point of View (3 lessons)

  2. Lessons for Point of View (3 lessons using multiple versions of "The Three Little Pigs" story)

  3. Lessons for Author's Purpose (3 lessons - may continue this in next unit)

Students can use the same texts and/or new texts from a variety of genres to study author's purpose.  The resources below contain lessons and activities:

  1. Author's Purpose PIE.pdf Multiple Activities for Author's Purpose (often using the "pie" symbolism)

  2. Author's Purpose Slideshow

Assessments

Understanding of point of view and author's purpose can be checked by observations during class activities, as well as with passages and multiple-choice questions like the ones given in the resources below.

  1. Online Practice Questions for Point of View

  2. Reading Passages and Multiple Choice Questions for Author's Purpose
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

What different purposes can authors write for?

How do authors entertain their readers?

Writing to Entertain

Students will be able to:

  1. Organize a writing piece into sentences and/or paragraphs based on the task.

  2. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  3. Write for shorter time frames appropriate to the task.

Resources

  1. Students can write an original story created to entertain the reader. They will use the features they are learning in reading to help them write.  Students should focus on revising for dialogue and editing for proper punctuation in dialogue and possessive situations.

  2. The Writing Process and Organizing Creative Writing (lessons)

  3. writing a story - organizing.pdf Using The Three Little Pigs as a Mentor Text to Show How to Organize a Story

Assessments

Student writing will be assessed for the elements of entertaining writing, as well as writing conventions. You may use a rubric like this one:

  1. Writing for Entertainment rubric.docx (can be used by both teacher and student to include self-assessment)
(2) L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
(1) L.3.2.c Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
(1) L.3.2.d Form and use possessives.
(1) RF.3.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

What types of punctuation can authors use?  Why is punctuation important to reading and writing?

How can readers read and understand new and unfamiliar words?

Punctuation (especially marks used in dialogue and possessive situations)

Decoding Skill Review

Students will be able to:

  1. Use initial sounds in a word to decode and read it properly.

  2. Use vowel sounds in a word to decode and read it properly.

  3. Use word parts to decode words and read them properly.

  4. Punctuate dialogue correctly, using commas and quotation marks.

  5. Use possessive nouns to write with appropriately.

Resources

  1. Students should focus on revising their writing piece for dialogue and editing for proper punctuation in dialogue and possessive situations.

  2. Students should review decoding skills, especially those that have proven more challenging.

decoding strategies poster.jpg

Assessments

  1. Student use of decoding skills and punctuation will be assessed through review of their editing of the writing piece.

  2. Writing for Entertainment rubric.docx Writing for Entertainment Rubric (can be evaluated by teacher or student)

How do authors write for different purposes?

How do readers read texts written for different purposes and in different points of view?

Exploring Point of View in Nonfiction Texts

(2 weeks)

Resources

Suggested Texts:

  1. Read-Aloud Suggestions for Author's Purpose
(1) RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

How can a reader tell who is telling the story?

Why is it important for a reader to know who is telling the story?

Why might an author write about his or her own life or someone else’s life? How can a reader identify this? 

What different purposes can authors write for?

Reading for Point of View in Nonfiction Texts

Reading Biographies and Autobiographies

Author's Purpose

Students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish the author's point of view in a nonfiction text.

  2. Compare point of view in different types of nonfiction texts.

  3. Identify the purpose of an author.

Resources

Students will build upon what they have learned in the previous unit author's purpose and point of view, using nonfiction texts.  These resources can be used:

  1. Lessons for Author's Purpose (3 lessons - continued from previous unit)

  2. Author's Purpose PIE.pdf Multiple Activities for Author's Purpose (often using the "pie" symbolism)

  3. Author's Purpose Slideshow

Students will focus in on biographies and autobiographies, and may use a graphic organizer like this:

  1. Biography Character Traits.pdf Biography Graphic Organizer and Activity

Assessments

  1. Reading Passages and Multiple Choice Questions for Author's Purpose
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

Why might an author write about his or her own life or someone else’s life?

How can an author write effectively for information?

Writing for Information: Biographies and Autobiographies

Students will be able to:

  1. Organize a writing piece into sentences and/or paragraphs based on the task.

  2. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  3. Write for shorter time frames appropriate to the task.

Resources

  1. Students can write a text to inform the reader, especially a biography or autobiography.  They will use the features they are learning in reading to help them write.

  2. Writing a Biography (4 lessons)

  3. Interactive Slideshow about Writing an Autobiography

  4. Autobiography unit with 11 lessons.pdf A more in-depth unit

Assessments

  1. Autobiography unit with 11 lessons.pdf Rubric for Scoring Autobiography Project (correlates with 11-lesson unit in Resources, see page 35)

  2. biography_rubric.doc Rubric for Scoring a Biography (allows for student self-assessment, teacher assessment, and comparison of the two)
(1) L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

How can readers determine the meaning of new and unknown words?

Vocabulary Skill Review

 

Students will be able to:

  1. Use a variety of skills to determine the meaning of new and unfamiliar words.

Resources

Students should review vocabulary strategies used in previous lessons and units, especially those that have proven to be more challenging.  These are some resources you can use:

  1. Context Clues practice.pdf

  2. Context Clues Unit.pdf

  3. prefix worksheet - variety of prefixes.pdf

Assessments

  1. Context clue practice activities can also be reviewed and scored for assessment.  In addition, understanding the meaning of new words will be evident if students use these words in their writing pieces.


 

(2) L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
(1) L.3.2.f Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
(2) L.3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
(1) L.3.3.a Choose words and phrases for effect.
(1) RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
(1) RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
(1) SL.3.6 Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.
(1) W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
(1) W.3.1.a Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
(1) W.3.1.b Provide reasons that support the opinion.
(1) W.3.1.c Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.
(1) W.3.1.d Provide a concluding statement or section.
(6) W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(6) W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
(1) W.3.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3 on pages 28 and 29.)
(1) W.3.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

Why do readers reread and look back in texts?

How can authors support their opinions?

How can writers persuade their readers to agree with their opinions?

How can authors of persuasive writing strengthen their writing?

Writing an Opinion Piece

(2 weeks)

Key Details/ Supporting Evidence

Opinion Writing

Persuasive Writing

 

Students will be able to:

  1. Answer questions, when you are reading a nonfiction text, that you have for a
    text by referring back and rereading.

  2. Answer questions that are posed by a speaker or written question by looking
    back in a nonfiction text.

  3. Identify the key details in the text that support the main idea and explain how
    they do so.

  4. Write an opinion piece, including an opinion and supporting reasons for that opinion.

  5. Organize an opinion piece by introducing an opinion and organizing reasons to support that opinion appropriately.

  6. When writing an opinion, provide adequate support for an opinion with accurate details.

  7. When writing an opinion, use linking words to connect the opinion and reasons.

  8. When writing an opinion, add a conclusion that supports the opinion and reasons.

  9. Organize a writing piece into sentences and/or paragraphs based on the task.

  10. Develop writing technique appropriate to the purpose of the writing.

  11. Plan writing, with guidance, to develop and organize ideas.

  12. Edit writing for spelling.

  13. Gather information from print and digital sources and integrate into a writing piece.

  14. Write for extended time frames to plan, revise, and edit writing to strengthen it for your audience.

  15. Speak in complete sentences that restate and/or clarify and idea or prompt.

  16. Use spelling patterns to write words.

  17. Choose words and phrases for effect, such as in a concluding statement.

Resources

Students will write an opinion piece, using reading skills to find details that support their opinions. You can review finding information. These graphic organizers can be used for additional practice:

  1. fact and opinion GO.pdf

  2. Finding Info graphic organizer.pdf

  3. Supporting Thinking with Evidence from the text GO.pdf

Once the opinion piece is written, students can revise to add linking words and a strong conclusion. They may turn the piece into persuasive writing. The graphic organizer below can be used.

  1. Persuasive Writing Planning GO.pdf

  2. Focus for editing should be spelling using the patterns that students have studied thus far.

  3. Students can also practice supporting their opinions by debating topics.  They prepare by choosing a topic and argument to agree with, finding evidence to support it, and then orally explain their positions clearly.
Common Core Suggested Glossary

NYLearns English Language Arts Glossary:  (Grades 3-5)

This glossary contains those terms found in or associated with the Common Core State Standards.  The glossary includes terms that are essential to understanding and developing mastery of the Standards. For additional definitions and terms, please refer to the appropriate Appendices for the ELA/Literacy or Math Common Core State Standards.

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