Last updated: 8/15/2021

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Grade 1 - Numbers and Operations in Base Ten

  Subject:   Mathematics (NYS P-12 Common Core)
  Grade:   Elementary, 1st Grade
  Unit Title:  

Grade 1 - Numbers and Operations in Base Ten

  Approx. Number of Weeks:  

Whole year

Unit Summary:

Develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value; in tens and ones including graphing.

Number lines will be used to show the sequential order of numbers.

Whole numbers will be grouped in 10s and 1s to 100, especially recognizing the numbers 11-19 as one group of ten.

Whole numbers to 100 will be compared and ordered to solve problems involving their relative size.

Measurement will be used to solve problems and support understanding of number lines and number relationships.

Data will be organized, represented and interpreted in up to 3 categories (data points).

Next Generation Skills Addressed:
   Collaboration & Communication
   Creativity & Innovation
   Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
   Research & Information Fluency
   Social & Emotional Intelligence

1. What will students know and be able to do?

Standards:



1.NBT.1 - Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.

1.NBT.2 - Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

1.NBT.3 - Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.

1.NBT.4 - Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

1.NBT.5 - Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.

1.NBT.6 - Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

1.MD.1 - Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.

1.MD.2 - Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps

1.MD.3 - Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. Recognize and identify coins, their names, and their value.

1.MD.4 - Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.


Essential Understandings:


Students will understand that…

 

Place value understanding can be used to develop strategies to represent and solve problems.

Numbers have value and can be joined, separated and compared.

 

  

Essential Questions:


What strategies should I use?

What does it mean for numbers to have value?

      Possible ways to scaffold the question:

  • How do number values change?
  • Why do number values change?

 

Students will know:


Counting numbers have a sequential order and can be represented on a number line.

Whole numbers can be compared for their relative size.

Place value and properties of operations can be used to add and subtract numbers.

Sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten when adding two-digit numbers.

Multiples of 10 between 10 and 90 can be subtracted from multiples of 10 between 10 and 90, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Strategies for subtracting multiples of 10 from multiples of 10 can be written and explained.

Measurement demonstrates number relationships.

The length of two objects can be compared indirectly by using a third object.

The length of an object can be expressed by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end.

Same size units that span an object with no gaps or overlaps are the length measurement of that object.

Time can be read on analog and digital clocks to the hour and half- hour and can be written.

Coins can be identified by name and for their value.

Word problems about money involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies can be solved using $ and cent symbols appropriately.

 Graphing representations organize data for analysis.

  

Students will be able to:


Number and Operations in Base Ten

Extend the counting sequence.

 • Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. (1.NBT.1)

 Understand place value.

• Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases: (1.NBT.2)

a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones—called a “ten.”

b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

•Compare two, two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.

• Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. (1.NBT.4)

Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

• Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. (1.NBT.5)

• Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. (1.NBT.6)

Measurement and Data

Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.

• Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object. (1.MD.1)

• Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gapsor overlaps. (1.MD.2)

 Tell and write time and money.

 • Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. (1.MD.3)

 Recognize and identify coins, their names, and their value.

Justification: this has real-world applications and provides a necessary foundation for the grade 2 standard (2.MD.8 – Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and cent symbols appropriately….).

 Represent and interpret data.

 • Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another. (1.MD.4)

Color Code Key: Gaps, Major Clusters, Supporting Clusters, Additional Clusters

2. How will we – and they – know?

Authentic Performance Task:


Common Benchmark Assessment:


3. What learning activities will students participate in?

Learning Activities:


 

Math Their Way- Center for Innovation in Education/Addison-Wesley

Box It and Bag It-The Math Learning Center

Developing Number Concepts—Addition and Subtraction by Kathy Richardson/Dale Seymour Publications

Developing Number Concepts—Counting, Comparing and Pattern by Kathy Richardson/Dale Seymour Publications

Daily Word Problems- Grade 1 Math/ Evan Moor Publications

Read It! Draw It! Solve It!—Grade 1/Dale Seymour Publications

 

Discipline Specific Considerations:


Vocabulary – Specialized and High Frequency

Count, number, tens, ones, more, less, numeral, compare, one-digit, two-digit, add, subtract, sum, difference, operation, equal, symbols for +, -, represent, length, measure, unit, penny, nickel, dime, quarter, hour hand, minute hand, clockwise, clock, analog, digital, value, strategy, graph, category, column, row, dollar, cent, greater than, less than, multiple of ten

Misconception Alerts:

True statements:

Transposing place value of numbers does impact development of number sense!

Reversing written numerals is developmental!

Understanding the value of the hour hand when the minute hand is at half-past the hour.

Common Core State Standards:  Standards for Mathematical Practice

 Standard 1:    Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them

Standard 2:    Reason abstractly and quantitatively

Standard 3:    Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

Standard 4:    Model with Mathematics

Standard 5:    Use appropriate tools strategically

Standard 6:   Attend to precision

Standard 7:  Look for and make use of structure

Standard 8:  Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

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