Last updated: 8/15/2021

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Grade 1 - Geometry

  Subject:   Mathematics (NYS P-12 Common Core)
  Grade:   Elementary, 1st Grade
  Unit Title:  

Grade 1- Geometry

  Approx. Number of Weeks:  

1-10 weeks

Unit Summary:

Develop an understanding that geometric shapes have relationships and properties.

Plane and solid figures will be composed and decomposed to understand part-whole relationships and properties.

(i.e. by putting 2 congruent isosceles triangles together to make a rhombus.)

Attributes and properties of geometric shapes will be described and compared.

2-D shapes will be manipulated to develop an initial understanding of congruence and symmetry.

Next Generation Skills Addressed:
   Collaboration & Communication
   Creativity & Innovation
   Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
   Research & Information Fluency
   Social & Emotional Intelligence

1. What will students know and be able to do?

Standards:



1.G.1 - Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

1.G.2 - Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.

1.G.3 - Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.


Essential Understandings:


Students will understand that…

Attributes are used to sort and classify geometric shapes.

Geometric shapes have defining attributes.

  

Essential Questions:


How do I describe a shape?

 

What are the defining attributes of geometric shapes?

Students will know:


Geometric shapes can be described by their attributes and properties.

Geometric shapes have congruence and symmetry.

  

Students will be able to:


Geometry

Reason with shapes and their attributes.

• Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size);

•  Build and draw shapes that possess defining attributes.

• Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles)or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.

•  Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of.

Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

 

Color Code Key: Gaps, Major Clusters, Supporting Clusters, Additional Clusters

 

2. How will we – and they – know?

Authentic Performance Task:


Common Benchmark Assessment:


3. What learning activities will students participate in?

Learning Activities:


 

Math Their Way- Center for Innovation in Education/Addison-Wesley

Box It and Bag It-The Math Learning Center

Daily Word Problems- Grade 1 Math/ Evan Moor Publications

Discipline Specific Considerations:


Vocabulary – Specialized and High Frequency

Circle, half-circle, quarter circle, square, triangle, rectangle, trapezoid, pattern blocks, reflections, polydrons, attributes, properties, geometric shapes, cube, right rectangular prism, right circular cone, right circular cylinder, two-dimensional shapes, three-dimensional composite shape, congruent, symmetry, halves, fourths, quarters, half-of, fourth-of, quarter-of, equal shares, smaller shares, size, describe, analyze, compare

Misconception Alerts

A square is not a rectangle. In fact, a square is a rectangle with equal sides.

The word diamond is not a mathematical term.   The geometric shape resembling a diamond is called a rhombus.

Common Core State Standards:  Standards for Mathematical Practice

 Standard 1:    Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them

Standard 2:    Reason abstractly and quantitatively

Standard 3:    Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

Standard 4:    Model with Mathematics

Standard 5:    Use appropriate tools strategically

Standard 6:   Attend to precision

Standard 7:  Look for and make use of structure

Standard 8:  Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

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