Last updated: 6/9/2016

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Sixth Grade-Nov/Dec

ELA

November

 

LANGUAGE ARTS

EXAMPLES OF NONFICTION

 

  • Determining Central idea and Supporting Details
  • Summarizing
  • Nonfiction Structure
  • Author's Perspective/Purpose
  • Contare/Contrast
  • Order/Sequence
  • Problem/Solution
  • Cause/Effect
  • Primary/Seconary
  • Persuasive Tecnhiques

 

 

MODULE 1: UNIT 2

  • Read myths to understand their purpose and elements
  • Reading Closely to Build Background Knowledge: “Myths and Legends”
  • Building Background Knowledge: The Myth of Cronus  
  • Using Details to Determine Theme: The Myth of Cronus
  • What Makes a Myth a Myth? Comparing Cronus and “Shrouded in Myth”  
  • Building Vocabulary: Working with Words about the Key Elements of Mythology  
  • Analyzing the Model Analytical Mini-Essay: “Elements of Mythology and Theme of Cronus
  • Exploring Allusions to Myths in The Lightning Thief: Close Reading Part 1 of “Prometheus”  
  • Analyzing Details in the Myth of Prometheus for Elements of Mythology and Theme  
  • Drafting an Analytical Mini- Essay: Using Partner Talk and Graphic Organizers to Guide Thinking
  • Determining Theme: Reading Myths in “Expert Groups”
  • Connecting the Theme of the Expert Group Myth to a Theme in The Lightning Thief and to Life Lessons
  • Building Writing Skills: Receiving Feedback and Varying Sentence Structure  
  • Fall Process Writing Piece-My Super Hero-Narrative Writing
  • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing aq narrative and/or characters.
  • Use dialogue, pacing, description to develop experiences and events or show the the responses of characters to situations.
  • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details mto convey experiences ans events precisely.
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated events.
  • Use technology for final published draft

 LANGUAGE ARTS

 

  • What makes a myth?
  • Why do myths matter? 
  • All stories have universal elements and themes.
  • What quality traits make up a Super Hero?
(1) L.6.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
(1) L.6.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
(2) RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RI.6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
(1) RI.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
(2) RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(1) RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
(2) RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
(1) W.6.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
(1) W.6.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Throughout the school year students will be practicing grammar skills on IXL.com

  • Homophones
  • Capitalization
  • Addresses
  • Thesaurus
  • Greek and Latin Roots
  • Quotation Marks
  • Main Idea
  • Letters
  • Idioms/Adages
  • Similes/Metaphors
  • Alphabetical Ordering
  • Contractions
  • Prefixes/Suffixes
  • Adjectives
  • Word Patterns/Analogies

 

STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Read and comprehend information in nonfiction text.
  • Infer meaning from nonfiction texts
  • Identify important vocabulary in nonfiction text.
  • Define important vocabulary in nonfiction text.
  • Determine the main idea of a nonfiction text.
  • Use features of non-fiction text to read and comprehend information.
  • Use story elements to identify and analyze point of view in nonfiction.

 

Lesson 3-Nonfiction Article

entice. acute, trigger, revive, impending, devastation, anecdote, erratic, inconclusive, portent

Lesson 4-Novel Excerpt

peripheral, submerge, maw, deluge, brunt, looming, wallow, ponderous, ecstatic, intact

  • Predictions Exit Sheet
  • Selected-response 
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Writing an Analytical Mini-Essay about Mythological Elements and Theme
  • Understanding the Allusion in Chapter 10
  • QuickWrite: The Most Important Thing
  • Student responses 
  • Observations of student thinking about vocabulary
  • Elements of Myth graphic organizer (for the model mini- essay) 
  • Theme graphic organizer (for the model mini-essay)
  •  Myth of Prometheus annotated for the gist  
  • Elements of Myth graphic organizer 
  • Theme graphic organize
  • Partner Writing: Analytical Mini- Essay recording form (two body paragraphs)  
  • Partner Writing: Analytical mini- essay recording form (introduction and conclusion)
  • Final draft of the analytical mini- essay 
  •  Expert group myth annotated for gist  
  •  Exit ticket: How Is Mythology Important Today?
  •  Mid-unit assessment 
  • Strengths and Goals index card 
  • Responding to Nonfiction Literature

Shrouded By Myth paragraphs.docx
The Lightning Thief PPT.pptx
Superhero Narrative Powerpoint.pptx
 

MODULE 1 UNIT 2

THE LIGHTNING THIEF

"Themes in Cronus"

D'Aulaire Book of Greek Myths

"Key Elements of Mythology"

 

  • Think - Pair - Share Protocol
  • Revisit Talk Expectations Chart
  • Carousel Brainstorm
  • Back - to - Back Protocol
  • Connecting The Lightning Thief and "Themes of Cronus"
  • Using Text Details to Determine the Main Idea
  • Exit Tickets   
  • Using Partner Talk and Graphic Organizers to Guide Thinking
  • Things I Notice/Things I Wonder About 

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson800/theme.pdf

Carousel of Quotes Unit 2 lesson 4 & 6.docx

 

ELA

December

MODULE 2: UNIT 1: Analyzing Figurative Language, Word Choice, Structure and Meaning

Bud, Not Buddy and Steve Jobs Commencement Speech Address

  • Launching the Novel and Understand Its Context (Chapter 1)
  • Figurative Language and Word Choice: A Closer Look at Bud, Not Buddy  (Chapter 2)
  • Analyzing Figurative Language and How the Author’s Word Choice Affects Tone and Meaning (Chapter 3)
  • Interpreting Figurative Language and Answering Selected Response Questions (Chapter 4)
  • Getting the Gist: Steve Jobs Commencement Address (Focus on Paragraphs 6-8, and connecting to Chapter 6)
  • Text-Dependent Questions and Choosing Details to Support a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 6– 8 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 7)
  • Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 12– 14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 8)
  • Text-Dependent Questions and Making a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 12–14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 9)
  • Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 20– 22 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 10)
  1. What are rules to live by? 
  2. How do people communicate these “rules”? 
  3. How does figurative language and word choice affect the tone and meaning of a text?
  4. Do people develop “rules to live by” through their own life experience?
  5. Are these “rules to live by” communicated through a variety of literary modes?
  6. Does the author’s word choice affect the tone and meaning of a text? 
(2) RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RI.6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
(1) RI.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
(2) RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
(1) RL.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
(1) SL.6.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
(1) SL.6.3 Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

MODULE 2: UNIT 1:

STUDENTS  WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud
  • Explain how the author's word choice affects meaning and tone in the novel.
  • Determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud Not Buddy.
  • Get the gist of Steve Jobs speech
  • Identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the text.
  • Read closely and answer text-dependent questions
  • Choose details from Steve Jobs speech to support a claim
  • Connect events from Steve Jobs speech and experiences with Bud.
  • Answer text dependent questions pertaining to Obama's Speech
  • Summarize points a speaker makes and explains how each claim is supported

GRAMMAR

  • Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning.
  • Use context relationships and comparisons in text
  • Use common, grade appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as the meaning of the words.
  • Interpret Figurative Language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
  • Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

Lesson 5

concoct, solemnly, conform, discreet, grace, dictate, snide, emblazon, aversion, unconventional

Lesson 6 (Days 1-5)-Nonfiction Article and Speech

impose, debilitate, slighted, incorporate, devise, appalling, adroit, meritorious, fortitude, impede

MODULE 2: UNIT 1:

  • Exit ticket: Who’s Bud? 
  • Tracking Bud’s Rules Graphic Organizer 
  • Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy Graphic Organizer
  • Selected Response Questions: Word Choice in Chapter 2
  • Exit ticket: Interpreting Figurative Language in Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author’s Word Choice and Tone Graphic Organizer
  • Entrance ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 4?
  • Selected Response Questions, Chapter 4
  • Figurative Language Graphic Organizer
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Figurative Language and Word Choice
  • Entrance ticket • Annotated Steve Jobs speech 
  • Exit ticket
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer
  • Connecting Events in the Steve Jobs Speech to Those in Bud, Not Buddy Graphic Organizer
  • Annotated Steve Jobs Speech  Venn Diagram
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing President Obama's 2009 Back-to-School Speech

Carousel of Quotes Unit 2 lesson 4 & 6.docx
 

MODULE 2: UNIT 1

  • Strategies for Answering Selected Response Questions
  • Carousel of Quotes protocol
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol
  • Strategies For Selected Response Questions
  • Strategies for Determining Unknown Words 
  • Connections Between Steve Jobs and Bud Chart

 

 

Math

November

Mathematics (November):

Finish Chapter 2: Fractions, Decimals, and Fractions

  • Percents and Decimals
  • Compare and Order Fractions, Decimals, Percents
  • Estimate with Percents
  • Percent of a Number: Inquiry Lab
  • Percent of a Number
  • Solve Percent Problems

 

 

 Chapter 2 (Glencoe): When is it better to use a fraction, a decimal, or a percent?

  1. What is the relationship between fractions and decimals? Sample answer: Fractions can be written as decimals and decimals can be written as fractions. Both fractions and decimals can be used to represent part of a whole.
  2. Why is it helpful to write a fraction as a percent? Sample answer: When fractions are written as percents, it is easier to compare the values.
  3. What is the relationship between percents and decimals? Sample answer: A percent is a ratio that compares a number to 100. Percents can be converted to equivalent decimals by dividing by 100 and removing the % sign.
  4. How are percents greater than 100% used in real-world contexts? Sample answer: Percents greater than 100% can show increases to the amount of money in a savings account or an increase in prices.
  5. How do you compare fractions, decimals, and percents? Sample answer: Write each value as a decimal with the same number of places. Then compare the values of the decimals.
  6. When is an estimate more useful than an exact answer? Estimates are useful when you are checking to see if your exact answer is reasonable.
  7. How do you find a percent of a number? Sample answer: Write the percent as a decimal. Multiply the decimal by the whole to find the part.
  8. How can you use proportions to solve percent problems? Sample answer: You can use a percent proportion to find the whole given the part and the percent.

 

 

 

(1) 6.NS.1 Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, create a story context for (2/3) / (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient; use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (2/3) / (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9 is 2/3. (In general, (a/b) / (c/d) = ad/bc.) How much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many 3/4-cup servings are in 2/3 of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi?
(2) 6.NS.2 Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm.
(2) 6.NS.3 Fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multi-digit decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation.
(1) 6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).

Mathematics:

least common denominator, percent, percent proportion, proportion, rational number

Mathematics:

Weekly Quizzes

Chapter Tests

Mathematics:

IXL.com

http://connected.mcgraw-hill.com/connected/login.do

Math

December

Mathematics (December): 

Chapter 3: Compute with Multi-Digit Numbers

  • Add and Subtract Decimals
  • Estimate Products
  • Multiply Decimals by Whole Numbers
  • Multiply Decimals by Decimals
  • Multiply Decimals by Powers of 10
  • Divide Multi-Digit Numbers
  • Estimate Quotients
  • Divide Decimals by Whole Numbers
  • Divide Decimals by Decimals

Cumulative Review

 

 

Chapter 3 (Glencoe): How can estimating be helpful?

  1. How is estimation helpful when adding and subtracting decimals? Sample answer: You can use estimation to check your answers for reasonableness.
  2. How do you determine which place value to use when estimating products? Sample answer: It is easier to multiply numbers that have been rounded to the greatest place value. However, the product may be more accurate if you round to a smaller place value.
  3. How can estimating products help you to place the decimal correctly? Sample answer: The estimate can help you determine the greatest place value. You can check for reasonableness by using estimation.
  4. Why is estimating not as helpful when multiplying very small numbers such as 0.007 and 0.053? Sample answer: Both numbers will round to 0. So, it will be difficult to know if you have multiplied correctly.
  5. How is estimation helpful when dividing multi-digit numbers? Sample answer: Estimation can help to determine the reasonableness of answers when dividing multi-digit numbers.
  6. When is it helpful to estimate quotients? Sample answer: It can be helpful in checking for reasonableness.
  7. How can estimating quotients help you to place the decimal correctly? Sample answer: The estimate can help you to determine if you have misplaced the decimal.
  8. When is it helpful to round the quotient to the nearest hundredth? Sample answer: It is helpful to round the quotient to the nearest hundredth when the quotient represents a monetary amount.

 

Mathematical Practices:

  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 

  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

  4. Model with mathematics.

  5. Use appropriate tools strategically.

  6. Attend to precision.

  7. Look for and make use of structure.

  8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

(2) 6.NS.2 Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm.
(2) 6.NS.3 Fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multi-digit decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation.

 

 

Compatible Numbers, Communative Property, reciprocals, dimensional analysis, unit ratio

Social Studies

November-December

Social Studies:

Continued: Beginning of Civilizations:

  • Students will explore the early human migration patterns and settlements through the use of multiple maps and the examination of various forms of archaeological evidence.
  • Students will be introduced to pastoral nomadic peoples as a culture type that existed throughout history.
  • Students will compare the use of tools, animals, types of dwellings, art, and social organizations of early peoples and distinguish between the Paleolithic Age and Neolithic Age.
  • Students will explore at least two river valley societies and civilizations: one in the Middle East (Mesopotamia and/or Nile River), one in South Asia (Indus River Valley), or one in East Asia (Yellow River Valley) by examiming archaeological and historical evidence to compare and constrast characteristics of these complex societies and civilizations.

Comparitive World Religions

  • Students will study the belief systems of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism by looking where the belief system originated, when it originated, founders if any, and the major tenets, practices, and sacred writings or holy texts for each.
  • Students will be able to identify similarities and differences across belief systems including their effect and social order and gender roles.
  • Students will explore the influence of various belief systems on contemporary cultures and events.
  • Students will locate the classical civilizations on a map and identify geographic factors that influenced the extent of their boundaries, locate their cities on a map, and identify their political structures.
  • Students will compare and contrast the similarities and differences of the Chinese (Qin, Han) and Greco-Roman classical civilizations by examining religion, job specialization, cities, government, language/record keeping system, technology, and social hierarchy.
  • Students will examine evidence related to the Qin, Han, and Greco-Roman (Athens and Roman Empire) civilizations and determine if these civilzations have experienced a golden age.
  • What should govenments do?
  • What are the consequences of technology?
  • How much does geography affect people's lives?
  • How are religion and culture connected?
  • Why do people move?
  • What should governments do?
  • What is power?  Who should have it?
  • How should we handle conflict?
(1) SS.6.4 COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS (ca. 2000 B.C.E – ca. 630 C.E): Major religions and belief systems developed in the Eastern Hemisphere. There were important similarities and differences between these belief systems.
(1) SS.6.5 COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.

Social Studies:

Beginning of Civilization:

  • Humans living together in settlements developed shared customs, beliefs, ideas, and languages that give identity to the group.
  • Complex societies and civilizations share the common characteristics of religion, job specialization, cities, government, language/record keeping system, technology, and social hierarchy.  People in Mesopotamia, Yellow River Valley, Indus River valley, Nile River valley developed complex societies and civilizations.
  • The Story of Gilgamesh
  • Early Agriculture
  • Cities and Civilizations

 VOCAB: revolution, domesticate, surplus, specialization, economy, civilization, resource, Fertile Crescent, Mesopotamia, irrigate, polytheism, cuneiform, barter, ally, rule of law

Social Studies:

Chapter Quiz

Chapter Test

Quarterly Projects

Social Studies:

pearsonsuccessnet.com

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