Last updated: 6/9/2016

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Sixth Grade-Sep/Oct

ELA

September

LANGUAGE ARTS

Writer's Notebook / Developing Seeds for Writing

  • M&M's / Laffy Taffy / Twizzlers / Jolly Rachers
  • Analyzing a Picture
  • Writing Behind a Picture
  • etc.....

Reader's Notebook / Books of Interest

  • Learning about Classroom Library

(Prentice Hall Literature Unit 1)

Elements of Fiction and Nonfiction and Identifying Differences

EXAMPLES OF FICTION- ELA Notebook

  • Identifying Character Traits - Motivation
  • Characterization
  • Genres
  • Conflict (Internal/External)
  • Man vs Self / Man vs Man / Man vs Nature / Man vs Society 
  • Determining Themes in Fiction
  • Point of View
  • Elements of Fiction
  • Types of Folktales

 

 

 

 

  • "HOW DO WE KNOW WHAT IS TRUE AND WHAT IS UNTRUE?"
(2) RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RI.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
(1) RI.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
(2) RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
(2) RL.6.3 Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
(2) RL.6.6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
(1) W.6.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

Students will be able to:

  • Employ strategies to preview a book.
  • Use criteria to identify and choose appropriate independent reading materials.
  • Establish and adjust purposes for reading, including to find out, to understand, to interpret, to enjoy, and to spolve problems.
  • Make connections between the ideas, people, messages, and themes in multiple texts.
  • Edit a personal journal entry for formal and informal writing.
  • Write personal journal entries to explore their thoughts, feelings, experiences.
  • Edit a personal journal entry.
  • Apply understandings of instruction in writing conventions and mechanics. 
  • Write personal journal entries to explore their thoughts, feelings, experiences.
  • Edit a personal journal entry.
  • Apply understandings of instruction in writing conventions and mechanics.

LANGUAGE ARTS

  • Fall Writing Benchmark
  • Fountas & Pinnell Reading Assessment
  • STARS ELA
  • Selected Tests
  • Test Practice: Making Predictions
  • Daily Reading Log - Use a reading log to allow students to complete a grade-appropriate reading log of the books they're reading, recording facts and responses to their independent books.
  • Teacher-Student Reading Conference Form  to collect information about students reading selections, comprehension, and any possible problems that require intervention. 
  • Goal Setting Record Forms- Meeting with student to set goals for grade level, lexile score and Fountas & Pinnell Reading Level.
  • Determining Importance Note Taking Form

 1st day Master Notebook.pptx

Me... as a writer.doc

LANGUAGE ARTS

Genre-Fiction

  • Yen Shen -Chinese Cinderella
  • Greyling by Jane Yolen
  • My Heart is In The Heartlands by Jane Yolen
  • Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry

Characterization-

  • Ta-Na-E-Ka

MAKING PREDICTIONS-

  • Stray by Cynthia Rylant
  • The Drive-In Movies by Gary Soto

 

COMPARING LITERARY WORKS:

 

  • Why Monkeys Live In Trees? by Julius Lester and
  • The Case of the Monkeys That Fell From The Trees by Susan E. Quinlan

 INTERNAL & EXTERNAL CONFLICTS

  • The Stone ( short story) by Alexander

 

FACT AND OPINION:

  • Ma Papa Mark Twain by Susy Twain
  • Names/Nombres by Julia Alvarez

 CONFLICT.pptx


fiction GREYLING assessment.docx


fiction template.pptx


FOLKTALE GENRES.pptx


GENRES OF FICTION.pptx


KNOW WHAT IS TRUE.pptx


TERRITORY MAPS.pptx

 

READING BOOKS USED THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

Red Kayak by Pricilla Cummings

Wringer by Jerry Spinelli

Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen

Pigman by Paul Zindel

Cupcake Wars by

Eragon by Christopher Paolini

Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Crispin by Avi

New Kids in Town Oral Histories of Immigrant Teens by Janet Bode

America Street A Multicultural Anthology of Stories by Anne Mazer

Rosa Parks My Storyby Rosa Parks

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

The Little Prince by Antoine DeSaint-Exupry

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert C. O'Brien

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELA

October

LANGUAGE ARTS

MODULE 1 UNIT 1 LESSONS #1- 13

Evaluating Percy as the Archetypal Hero

 

BUILDING BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE:

PERCY JACKSON AND THE HERO'S JOURNEY

BEGIN THE LIGHTNING THIEF

  • Make Inferences about the character
  • Read informational text, "The Hero's Journey"
  • Analyze the stages of the hero's journey
  • Cite text-based evidence in literary/informational texts
  • Aligning The Hero's Journey with The Lightning Thief
  • Use Context Clues to determine words in literary/informational texts 
  • Engage in Discussion Groups
  • Character Development
  • Identify the Gist
  • Point of View
  • Main Idea of Informational text
  • Use evidence to support analysis, reflection and research.
  • Write with evidence
  • What is a Hero?
(2) RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(2) RI.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
(2) RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(1) RL.6.11 Recognize, interpret, and make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events, and situations.
(1) RL.6.11.a Self-select text based on personal preferences.
(2) RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
(2) RL.6.3 Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
(1) RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
(1) RL.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
(2) RL.6.6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

Lesson 1-Personal Narrative

crescendo, abyss, retract, disillusioned, buffet, turbulence, conspire, imprudent, intrepid, clandestine

Lesson 2-Fable

realm, plod, disdainful, tawdry, glut, deride, copious, eclipse, appraise, ironic

  • Quick Write: Response to quote and Picture
  • Annotated texts "Shrouded in Myth"
  • Exit Tickets
  • Questions from Text Chapter 1
  • Entrance Ticket
  • Actions vs. Inner Thoughts-Exit Ticket
  • Prefixes Recording Form
  • Mid-Unit Assessment
  • Lesson 8
  • Vocabulay Recording Form
  • Text Dependent Questions
  • Selecting Evidence Organizer
  • Writing with Evidence
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment

CAROUSEL OF QUOTES UNIT 1 LESSON 3.docx


Chart Headings For Lessons 1-5.docx


Shrouded By Myth paragraphs.docx


The Lightning Thief PPT.pptx

 

MODULE 1 UNIT 1 THE LIGHTNING THIEF

 

  • Think - Pair - Share Protocol
  • Fist to Five Chart
  • Things Close Readers do Chart
  • Triad Talk Expectations Chart
  • Make Inferences About Percy
  • Carousel Brainstorm Protocol
  • Inferring About Character: Challenges and Responses Chart
  • Close Reading Protocol
  • Back - to - Back Protocol
  • Connecting The Lightning Thief and the "The Hero's Journey"

 

Math

September

Mathematics (September):

Numerical Expressions & Factors

(Big Ideas Book Chapter 1)

  • Whole Number Operations
  • Powers and Exponents
  • Order of Operations
  • Prime Factorization
  • Greatest Common Factor
  • Least Common Multiple

 Fractions and Decimals

(Big Ideas Book Chapter 2)

  • Multiplying Fractions
  • Dividing Fractions
  • Dividing Mixed Numbers
  • Adding and Subtracting Decimals
  • Multiplying Decimals
  • Dividing Decimals

 

Chapter 1 (Big Ideas):

  • How do you know which operation to choose when solving a real-life problem?
  • How can you use repeated factors in real-life situations?

  • What is the effect of inserting parentheses into a numerical expression?

  • Without dividing, how can you tell when a number is divisible by another number?

  • How can you find the greatest common factor of two numbers?

  • How can you find the least common multiple of two numbers?

Chapter 2 (Big Ideas):

  • What does it mean to multiply fractions?
  • How can you divide by a fraction?
  • How can you model division by a mixed number?
  • How can you add and subtract decimals?
  • How can you multiply decimals?
  • How can you use base ten blocks to model decimal division?

 

(1) 6.NS.1 Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, create a story context for (2/3) / (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient; use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (2/3) / (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9 is 2/3. (In general, (a/b) / (c/d) = ad/bc.) How much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many 3/4-cup servings are in 2/3 of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi?
(1) 6.NS.2 Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm.
(2) 6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).

Mathematics:

greatest common factor

least common multiple

prime factorization

Mathematics:

Weekly Quizzes

Chapter Test

Mathematics:

IXL.com

bigideasmath.com

Math

October

Mathematics (October):

Chapter 1:

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

  • Factors and Multiples
  • Ratios
  • Unit Rates
  • Equations
  • Ratio Tables
  • Graph Ratio Tables
  • Problem Solving Investigation
  • Equivalent Ratios
  • Ratio and Rate Problems

 

Begin Chapter 2:

 Fractions, Decimals, and Percents

  • Decimals and Fractions
  • Model Percents
  • Percents and Fractions
  • Percents and Decimals
  • Percents Greater than 100% and Percent Less Than 1%

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1 (Glencoe): How do you use equivalent rates in the real world?

  1. How does finding the greatest common factor help you to solve real-world problems? Sample answer: The greatest common factor can help you to divide a number of different items equally among a group of people.
  2.  How can you use mental math to determine if a ratio is simplified? Sample answer: If the fraction is in simplest form, the GCF of the numerator and the denominator is 1.
  3. How are rates and ratios related? Sample answer: A rate is a ratio that compares two quantities with different kinds of units, such as miles per hour.
  4. How can you determine if two ratios are equivalent? Sample answer: Two ratios are equivalent if they simplify to the same ratio. For example, 1:3, 2:6, and 3:9 are equivalent because they all simplify to 1:3.
  5. How can graphing help solve a problem involving ratios? Sample answer: A graph shows which ratio is greater when comparing 2 ratios.
  6. How can you determine if two ratios are equivalent? Sample answer: You can find the unit rate of each ratio and compare them.
  7. How can you use diagrams and equations to solve ratio and rate problems? Sample answer: You can divide a bar diagram into the correct number of sections to find the unit rate. Use the unit rate to solve the rate or ratio problem.

 

Chapter 2 (Glencoe): When is it better to use a fraction, a decimal, or a percent?

  1. What is the relationship between fractions and decimals? Sample answer: Fractions can be written as decimals and decimals can be written as fractions. Both fractions and decimals can be used to represent part of a whole.
  2. Why is it helpful to write a fraction as a percent? Sample answer: When fractions are written as percents, it is easier to compare the values.
  3. What is the relationship between percents and decimals? Sample answer: A percent is a ratio that compares a number to 100. Percents can be converted to equivalent decimals by dividing by 100 and removing the % sign.
  4. How are percents greater than 100% used in real-world contexts? Sample answer: Percents greater than 100% can show increases to the amount of money in a savings account or an increase in prices.
  5. How do you compare fractions, decimals, and percents? Sample answer: Write each value as a decimal with the same number of places. Then compare the values of the decimals.
  6. When is an estimate more useful than an exact answer? Estimates are useful when you are checking to see if your exact answer is reasonable.
  7. How do you find a percent of a number? Sample answer: Write the percent as a decimal. Multiply the decimal by the whole to find the part.
  8. How can you use proportions to solve percent problems? Sample answer: You can use a percent proportion to find the whole given the part and the percent.

 

 

Mathematical Practices:

 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 

 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

 4. Model with mathematics.

 5. Use appropriate tools strategically.

 6. Attend to precision.

 7. Look for and make use of structure.

 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

 

(2) 6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).
(1) 6.RP.1 Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities. For example, "The ratio of wings to beaks in the bird house at the zoo was 2:1, because for every 2 wings there was 1 beak." "For every vote candidate A received, candidate C received nearly three votes."
(1) 6.RP.2 Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio a:b with b ≠ 0, and use rate language in the context of a ratio relationship. For example, "This recipe has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is 3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar." "We paid $75 for 15 hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger."
(1) 6.RP.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations.
(1) 6.RP.3.a Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with wholenumber measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate plane. Use tables to compare ratios.
(1) 6.RP.3.b Solve unit rate problems including those involving unit pricing and constant speed. For example, if it took 7 hours to mow 4 lawns, then at that rate, how many lawns could be mowed in 35 hours? At what rate were lawns being mowed?
(1) 6.RP.3.c Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

coordinate plane

equivalent ratio

graph

greatest common factor

least common multiple

ordered pair

origin

prime factorization

rate

ratio

ratio table

scaling

unit price

x-axis

x-coordinate

y-axis

y-coordinate

http://connected.mcgraw-hill.com/connected/login.do

Social Studies

September-October

Social Studies:

Geography and History of the Eastern Hemisphere

The course begins with an examination of the Eastern Hemisphere today using geographic skills including the development of cultures, civilizations, and empires.

Chapter 1: Early People Exploring the Stone Age: Mary Leakey

  • Studying the Distant Path of human populations that settled along the rivers, rain forests, along coastlines, in deserts, and in mountains who made use of the resources and the environment around them in developing distinct ways of life.
  • Early peoples in the Eastern Hemisphere are often studied by analyzing artifacts and archaeological features.  Archaeologists engage in digs and study artifacts and features in a particular location to gather evidence about a group of people and how they lived at a particular time.
  • The Neolithic Revolution was marked by technological advances in agriculture and domestication of animals that allowed people to form semi-sedentary and sedentary settlements.
  • Throughout history, societies and cultures have organized time in different ways.
  • Maps can be used to represent varied climate zones, landforms, bodies of water, and resources of the Eastern Hemisphere.
  • What are the consequences of technology?
(1) SS.E.2.1 The study of world history requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. This study also examines the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives.
(1) SS.E.2.2 Establishing timeframes, exploring different periodizations, examining themes across time and within cultures, and focusing on important turning points in world history help organize the study of world cultures and civilizations.
(1) SS.E.2.3 Study of the major social, political, cultural, and religious developments in world history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.

Social Studies:

  • Measuring Time
  • Historical Sources
  • Archaelogy and Other Sources
  • Geography's Five Themes
  • Understanding Maps: The Eastern Hemisphere climate zones, landforms, bodies of water, and resources of the Eastern Hemisphere.
  • The physical environment influences human population distribution, land use, economic activities, and political connections.
  • Historical Maps
  • What is culture?

Vocab: historian, timeline, chronology, period, prehistory, archaeology, anthropology, oral tradition, absolute location, relative location, region, human movement interaction, historical map, ethics, religion

Social Studies:

Chapter Quiz

Chapter Test

Quarterly Projects

Social Studies:

pearsonsuccessnet.com

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