Last updated: 6/9/2016

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Sixth Grade-March/April

ELA

March

LANGUAGE ARTS

Supporting the Standards Reading Comprehension

Historical Texts

 

  • "When in Rome...or Brazil" (Summarize, Chronology and Sequence)
  • "Restoring a Classic" (Identify Steps in a Process, Integrate Visual Information)
  • Critical Thinking Strategies

POETRY- 

  • Prose vs Poetry-
  • Langston Hughes-
  • Langston Hughes-
  • All About Me - Sensory
  • All ABout Me - Ancestory
  • Robert Frost

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE ARTS

  • What are features of Historical Texts?
  • How do we summarize a text?
  • What are key words or phrases to look for when sequencing?
  • How does visual information aide in the understanding of the text?

 

(1) L.6.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
(1) RI.6.3 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
(1) RI.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
(1) RI.6.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
(1) RI.6.7 Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
(1) RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
(1) RL.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
(1) RL.6.6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
(1) W.6.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
(2) W.6.11 Create and present a text or art work in response to literary work.
(2) W.6.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
(1) W.6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

LANGUAGE ARTS

GRAMMAR

  • Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning.
  • Use context relationships and comparisons in text
  • Use common, grade appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as the meaning of the words.
  • Interpret Figurative Language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
  • Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.
  • Maintaining consistent tone.

 

 Historical Texts- "The Evolution of Maps"

Skills (Summarizing, chronology, sequencing, Identify Steps in a Process, Integrate Visual Information)

POETRY BOOKS

  • Angel For Solomon Singer
  • "Mother To Son"
  • Comin Home
  • "Where I'm From"
  • "If I Were In Charge Of The World"
  • "Walking In Woods"

ELA

April

Writing Informative Essays

Analyzing mentor texts

Researching the topic(integrating Social Unit)

Using Visuals to aid in comprehension

The Writing Process 

 PARENT / TEACHER CONFERENCES

SPRING BREAK

NEW YORK STATE TESTING

How do Informational Texts use facts and details to explain or deliver information effectively?

How much does geography affect peoples lives?

How does the achievements of ancient Egyptians affect our lives today?

(1) RI.6.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
(1) RI.6.9 Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
(1) SL.6.4 Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
(1) SL.6.5 Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.
(1) SL.6.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
(2) W.6.11 Create and present a text or art work in response to literary work.
(2) W.6.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
(1) W.6.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
(1) W.6.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.
(1) W.6.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
(1) W.6.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.

EGYPT PROJECT.doc


Inform Explanatory Rubric (Autosaved).docx


Inform Explanatory Rubric (Autosaved)-M.docx


INFORMATIVE ESSAY checklist modified.docx


INFORMATIVE ESSAY checklist.docx


Informative essay Egypt modified 2.docx


Informative essay Egypt.docx


Informative essay introduction.pptx


Introduction Paragraph.docx


Mt Versuvius Paraphrasing.docx


 

Math

March

Mathematics (March):

Chapter 6: Expressions (Continued)

  • Algebra: Variables and Expressions
  • Write Expressions
  • Algebra: Properties
  • The Distributive Property
  • Equivalent Expressions

Chapter 7: Equations

  • Equations
  • Solve and Write Addition Equations
  • Solve and Write Subtraction Equations
  • Guess, Check, and Revise: Problem Solving
  • Solve and Write Multiplication Equations
  • Solve and Write Division Equations

Mathematics:

Chapter 6 (Glencoe): How is it helpful to write numbers in different ways?

  1. How is using exponents helpful? Sample answer: A product of like factors can be written in a simpler, shorter format using exponents. For example 9 × 9 × 9 × 9 × 9 × 9 × 9 × 9 can be written as 98.
  2. How are grouping symbols helpful in simplifying expressions correctly? Sample answer: Grouping symbols like parentheses help identify the expression(s) that must first be simplified.
  3. How are numerical expressions and algebraic expressions different? Sample answer: Numerical expressions include only numerical values and operations. Algebraic expressions can include numerical values, operations, and variables.
  4. How can writing phrases as algebraic expressions help you solve problems? Sample answer: Key words and phrases, such as four times as many, can help you to determine which operation to use in an expression in order to solve a problem.
  5. How can using properties help you to simplify expressions? Sample answer: The properties can help you to mentally solve problems.
  6. How can the Distributive Property help you to rewrite expressions? Sample answer: You can rewrite a sum of two whole numbers with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor.
  7. How can properties help to write equivalent algebraic expressions? Sample answer: To find equivalent algebraic expressions, apply the properties and combine like terms, if needed.

 

Chapter 7 (Glencoe): How do you determine if two numbers or expressions are equal?

  1. How do you solve an equation? By finding a value for the variable that makes the equation true.
  2. How can the Subtraction Property of Equality be used to solve addition equations? Sample answer: It allows you to subtract the same number from each side of the equation.
  3. How can the Addition Property of Equality be used to solve subtraction problems? Sample answer: It allows you to add the same number to each side of the equation.
  4. How can the Division Property of Equality be used to solve multiplication problems? Sample answer: It can be used to undo multiplication because division is the inverse of multiplication.
  5. When solving an equation, why is it necessary to perform the same operation on each side of the equals sign? Sample answer: To maintain equality, an operation performed on one side of an equation must also be performed on the other side.

 

(2) 6.EE.2 Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers.
(1) 6.EE.2.a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. For example, express the calculation "Subtract y from 5" as 5 - y.
(1) 6.EE.2.b Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient); view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity. For example, describe the expression 2 (8 + 7) as a product of two factors; view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum of two terms.
(2) 6.EE.2.c Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving wholenumber exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For example, use the formulas V = s3 and A = 6 s2 to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s = 1/2.
(1) 6.EE.3 Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y.
(1) 6.EE.4 Identify when two expressions are equivalent (i.e., when the two expressions name the same number regardless of which value is substituted into them). For example, the expressions y + y + y and 3y are equivalent because they name the same number regardless of which number y stands for.
(2) 6.EE.5 Understand solving an equation or inequality as a process of answering a question: which values from a specified set, if any, make the equation or inequality true? Use substitution to determine whether a given number in a specified set makes an equation or inequality true.
(1) 6.EE.7 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by writing and solving equations of the form x + p = q and px = q for cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational numbers.
(2) 6.EE.8 Write an inequality of the form x > c or x < c to represent a constraint or condition in a real-world or mathematical problem. Recognize that inequalities of the form x > c or x < c have infinitely many solutions; represent solutions of such inequalities on number line diagrams.
(1) 6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).
(2) 6.NS.8 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.
(1) 6.RP.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations.

Mathematics:

Chapter 6:

Distributive Property

equivalent expressions

evaluate

exponent

factor the expression

Identity Properties

like terms

numerical expression

perfect square

powers

properties

term

variable

 

Chapter 7:

Addition Property of Equality

Division Property of Equality

equals sign

equation

Inverse operations

Multiplication Property of Equality

solution

solve

Subtraction Property of Equality

 

Mathematics:

Weekly Quizzes

Chapter Test

Mathematics:

IXL.com

http://connected.mcgraw-hill.com/connected/login.do

Math

April

Mathematics (April):

Chapter 8: Functions and Inequalities

  • Function Tables
  • Function Rules
  • Functions and Equations
  • Multiple Representations of Functions
  • Make A Table
  • Inequalities
  • Write and Graph Inequalities
  • Solve One-Step Inequalities

Chapter 9: AREA

  • Area of Parallelograms
  • Area of Triangles
  • Area of Trapezoids
  • Polygons on the Coordinate Plane

Chapter 10: Volume and Surface Area

  • Volume of Rectangular Prisms
  • Volume of Triangular Prisms
  • Surface area of Prisms
  • Nets of Prisms and Pyramids

Chapter 8 (Glencoe): How are symbols, such as <,>, and = useful?

  1. How can a function table help you find input or output? When data is organized, I can use the function rule and the input to find the output or work backward using the output and the function rule to find the input.
  2. What is the difference between an arithmetic sequence and a geometric sequence? Sample answer: Both are numerical patterns, but arithmetic sequences are additive and geometric sequences are multiplicative.
  3. How are ordered pairs of a function used to create the graph of the function? Each set of ordered pairs can be plotted on a coordinate plane. A line is then drawn through each point.
  4. Why do you represent functions in different ways? Sample answer: to be able to analyze the relationship between the two quantities in different representations
  5. How can mental math help you find solutions to inequalities? Mental math can help determine if a certain number makes the inequality true.
  6. How can graphing an inequality help to solve it? Graphing shows multiple solutions to an inequality.
  7. How is solving an inequality similar to solving an equation? Sample answer: You can use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division properties to solve both.

 

Chapter 9 (Glencoe): How does measurement help you solve problems in everyday life?

  1. How are parallelograms related to triangles and rectangles? Sample answer: Parallelograms can be decomposed into triangles, or composed into rectangles. You can find the area of parallelograms using the relationship to triangles and rectangles.
  2. How is the formula for the area of a triangle related to the formula for the area of a parallelogram? Sample answer: A parallelogram can be decomposed into two congruent triangles. So, the formula for the area of a triangle, A = 1/2bh, is one half the area of a parallelogram, A = bh.
  3. How is the formula for the area of a trapezoid related to the formula for the area of a parallelogram? Sample answer: A parallelogram can be decomposed into two congruent trapezoids. So the area of each trapezoid is one half the area of the parallelogram.
  4. How can exponents help you find the area of a rectangle if each side length is multiplied by x? Sample answer: The original area is multiplied by x2 to find the new area.
  5. How can coordinates help you to find the area of figures on the coordinate plane? Sample answer: Coordinates can be used to identify a figure and find the lengths of the sides. The lengths of the sides can be used in the area formulas for various figures.
  6. How can you decompose figures to find areas? Sample answer: Decompose figures into areas that you know how to find. Then add to find areas of composite figures, or subtract areas of overlapping figures.

 

Chapter 10 (Glencoe): How is shape important when measuring a figure?

  1. Why can you use either the formula V = ℓwh or V = Bh to find the volume of a rectangular prism? Sample answer: The area of the base can be represented as   × w or as B. To find the volume of the prism, multiply the area of the base by the height of the prism.
  2. How is the area of a triangle related to the volume of a triangular prism? Sample answer: To find the volume of a triangular prism, you multiply the area of the triangular base B times the height h of the prism.
  3. What is the relationship between area and surface area? Sample answer: Surface area is calculated for a threedimensional figure. It is the sum of the areas of the surfaces that make up the three-dimensional figure.
  4. How is the area of a rectangle related to the surface area of a triangular prism? Sample answer: A triangular prism has three rectangular faces. You can use the area of a rectangle to find the area of the three rectangular faces of a triangular prism.
  5. How do you use the area of a triangle to find the surface area of a triangular pyramid? Sample answer: The base and all three lateral faces of a triangular pyramid are triangles. Use the area of a triangle to find the area of each face.

 

Mathematical Practices:

   1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 

   2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

   3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

   4. Model with mathematics.

   5. Use appropriate tools strategically.

   6. Attend to precision.

   7. Look for and make use of structure.

   8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

 

 

 

 

 

(2) 6.EE.2 Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers.
(2) 6.EE.2.c Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving wholenumber exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For example, use the formulas V = s3 and A = 6 s2 to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s = 1/2.
(2) 6.EE.5 Understand solving an equation or inequality as a process of answering a question: which values from a specified set, if any, make the equation or inequality true? Use substitution to determine whether a given number in a specified set makes an equation or inequality true.
(1) 6.EE.6 Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a real-world or mathematical problem; understand that a variable can represent an unknown number, or, depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.
(2) 6.EE.8 Write an inequality of the form x > c or x < c to represent a constraint or condition in a real-world or mathematical problem. Recognize that inequalities of the form x > c or x < c have infinitely many solutions; represent solutions of such inequalities on number line diagrams.
(1) 6.EE.9 Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time.
(1) 6.G.1 Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals, and polygons by composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes; apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
(1) 6.G.2 Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with fractional edge lengths by packing it with unit cubes of the appropriate unit fraction edge lengths, and show that the volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths of the prism. Apply the formulas V = l w h and V = b h to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with fractional edge lengths in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
(1) 6.G.3 Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to find the length of a side joining points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
(1) 6.G.4 Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
(2) 6.NS.8 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.

Chapter 8:

arithmetic sequence, dependent variable, function, function rule, function table, geometric sequence, indpendent variable, inequality, linear function, sequence, term

 

Chapter 9:

base, composite figure, congruent, formula, height, parallelogram, polygon, rhombus

 

Chapter 10:

base, cubic units, lateral face, prism, pyramid, rectangular prism, slant height, surface area, three-dimensional figure, triangular prism, vertex, volume

Social Studies

March-April

Social Studies:

Interactions Across the Eastern Hemisphere

  • Students will create maps that illustrate items exchanged and ideas spread along the Silk Roads, across the Indian Ocean, and on the Trans-Siberian trade routes.
  • Students will examine how the location of resources helped determine the location of trade routes and the economic impact of the exchange of resources.
  • Students will study interregional travelers such as Marco Polo, Ibn Battuta, Mansa Musa, and Zheng He and examine why they traveled, the places visited, what was learned, and what was exhanged as a result of their travel.
  • What are the consequences of technology?
(1) SS.6.7 INTERACTIONS ACROSS THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 C.E. – ca. 1450): Trade networks promoted the exchange and diffusion of language, belief systems, tools, intellectual ideas, inventions, and diseases.

Social Studies:

VOCAB: bureaucracy, scholar-official, merit system, urbanization, money economy, porcelain

Social Studies:

Chapter Quiz

Chapter Test

Quarterly Projects

Social Studies:

pearsonsuccessnet.com

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